Coagulation Factor VII Deficiency

BUY NOW >> Factor VII is a coagulation factor involved in blood clotting. A mutation in Factor VII inhibits blood clotting.  A DNA test for this is available at the Animal Health Trust DNA testing service.

A mutation in Factor VII was identified at the University of Pennsylvania, this mutation inhibits blood clotting. This can be largely asymptomatic in many dogs, but can lead to excessive bleeding after trauma or surgery.

Breeds Affected

This mutation has been found in Beagles, Deerhounds (Scottish), Giant Schnauzers, Alaskan Klee Kai and Airedale Terriers.

How is the disease inherited?

The disorder shows an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance, which means that two copies of the defective gene (one inherited from each parent) have to be present for a dog to be affected by the disease.

Individuals with one copy of the defective gene and one copy of the normal gene, called carriers, show no signs of disease but can pass the defective gene onto their offspring. Some Laboratory studies have suggested that carriers may experience a decrease in clotting activity.

When two carriers are crossed, 25% (on average) of the offspring will be affected by the disease, 25% will be clear and the remaining 50% will themselves be carriers.

Owners will receive one of three results for their dog.

Clear: The dog has 2 copies of the normal gene and will not develop Factor VII deficiency and will not pass this on to any offspring.

Carrier: The dog has one copy of the normal gene and one copy of the mutation. The dog will not develop Factor VII deficiency but can pass the mutation on to its offspring.

Affected: The dog carries two copies of the Factor VII mutation. This means the dog will suffer from Factor VII deficiency and will pass this mutation on to any offspring.

 

Breeding advice

Dogs carrying this mutation can still be breed to clear dogs.  Such a mating will on average results in 50% of the puppies being clear of this mutation and 50% that are carriers of this mutation. Pups that will be used for breeding should then be DNA tested themselves to determine if they are carriers of clear.

If an affected dog is breed to a clear dog, all puppies will be carriers of this mutation.

Cubs/Associations receiving results

Results for Beagles are reported to the Kennel Club.

Results are only reported to clubs and associations within the country of residence given when ordering.

 

For more information please contact us and we’ll be happy to deal with your enquiry.